Posted by: mynaturaldiary | July 2, 2013

Bartlett Nab

The RSPB reserve at Bempton Cliffs have many viewing points to see the many seabirds, including Gannets.

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130702# (9)Gannet (Morus bassanus)

These magnificent seabirds come into their own in the air, with their wide wingspan.

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at a different angle, the wingspan looks small compared to their head and body, all perfectly streamlined.

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Close to, a green line can be seen along their legs.

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They are excellent gliders, taking advantage of the updraft from the cliffs.

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The skies are filled with birds.

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And they cling to the ledges of the cliff, where they nest.

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They aren’t the only birds on these ledges. Guillemots  also cling on.

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Guillemot (Uria aalge)

with Razorbills.

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Razorbill (Alca torda)

Other  seabirds nest on the ledges. Fulmars appear to fly with stiff wings, true gliders.

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Fulmar (Fulmarus glacialis)

The visitors centre is home to many Tree Sparrows.

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Tree Sparrow (Passer montanus)

You can tell the males apart from House Sparrows, who have a grey head patch.


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