Posted by: mynaturaldiary | February 11, 2009

Wildlife Watchpoint (water) #1

The new RSPB reserve at Saltholme has now opened!  Access is from the A178, just north of the Transporter Bridge.  The visitor centre is now open, and is magnificent.

So far, only one hide (Wildlife Watchpoint) is open, with another two scheduled for later in the year.

This rather old satellite image shows its location. The wetland has flooded considerably more than the satellite shows, creating open water, reedbeds and mudflats.  To the rear of the hide is a feeding point with seeds.

As you might expect from a wetland centre, there were a lot of ducks.  In the far distance were Teal.

07020921

07020933

Teal (Anas crecca)

These are distinguishable from other ducks by the males tails which have a yellow triangle, flanked with black, together with a white stripe along the side.

Throughout the day, we had Gadwall as visitors.

07020912

The low light level doesn’t pay justice to his plumage (although you can see the water run off his head).  In brighter light Mr Gadwall’s brownish head and grey plumage is visible.

07020920

07020955

07020959

Gadwall (Anas strepera)

Both Mr and Mrs Gadwall have a white patch on their flank, with Mr Gadwall having a black rear, whereas  Mrs Gadwall is well camouflaged.

Throughout the day, we had a Shoveler duck for company.

07020939

07020950

07020954

Shoveler (Anas clypeata)

Mr Shoveler has a bright green head, with a striking yellow eye, together with a brown flank.

Wigeon are fairly common on the reserve.

07020964

07020945

07020947

Wigeon (Anas penelope)

Mr Wigeon’s winter plumage, with a brown head and yellow stripe, together with a white band on his wings is most striking.

A Shelduck made an appearance.

07020983

Shelduck (Tadorna tadorna)

His dark head, with a marked red rise on his forehead makes him unmistakeable.

Here’s a fine shot of a pair of Greylag Geese.

07020926

Greylag Goose (Anser anser)

A Redshank wader also made an appearance.

07020970

07020978

07020967

Redshank (Tringa totanus)

Finally, here’s some more common species.

07020965

Mallard (Anas platyrhynchos)

07020923

Coot (Fulica atra)

In the bottom right of the picture below is a Moorhen, red beak and green legs resplendent.

07020928

Moorhen (Gallinula chloropus)

07020958

Mute Swan (Cygnus olor)

In the next post, I’ll share the birds seen at the feeding station.


Responses

  1. […] more than the satellite shows, creating open water, reedbeds and mudflats.  In the last post, I showed some of the wetland birds.  To the rear of the hide is a feeding point with seeds. […]


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Categories

%d bloggers like this: